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Information Rights in Practice

Jan 2008 | 224pp

Paperback
9781856046206
Price: £64.95
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9781856049931
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Information Rights in Practice
The non-legal professional's guide

Alan Stead

Overstretched professionals in every public authority are grappling with the chalk face implications of a raft of legislation relating to information use. This is the first book to offer a single point of reference and advice, which can be understood by the non-legal professional.
 
The requirements of the relevant legislation are set out together with examples, flow-charts, and diagrams to illustrate and clarify how to apply the law in practice. This indispensable guide is a one-stop shop for all you need to know about information rights law, using relevant case studies to clarify and illuminate these tricky issues. Contents include:
  • Data Protection Act 1998: definitions of personal data; scope of the Act; the principles; access to personal data and data sharing
  • Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004: scope of the Acts; applications of exemptions/exceptions; public interest tests, publication schemes; disclosure logs and records management
  • Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000
  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • Reuse of Public Sector Information Regulations 2005
  • other non-information rights-related legislation
  • interaction of legislation
  • requests for information.  
Readership: A must-have for anyone working with information rights in public authorities and the private sector, this book is also a useful reference point for legal advisers, academics and students of information rights, as well as media professionals wanting to learn and understand how public authorities approach requests for information and the surrounding procedures.

1. Introduction
 
1.1 Overview
1.2 History
1.3 Summary
 
2. Data Protection Act 1998
 
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Definitions
2.2.1 Data Controller
2.2.2 Data Processor
2.2.3 Data Subject
2.2.4 Processing
2.2.5 Relevant Filing System
2.3 Summary
 
3. Definitions of Personal Data
 
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Deceased Persons
3.3 Substantive Personal Data
3.3 Identified by Secondary reference
3.4 Third Party Data
3.5 Relevant Persons
3.6 Sensitive Personal Data
3.7 Summary
 
4. The Scope of the Data Protection Act
 
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Credit Reference Agencies
4.3 Right to stop processing
4.4 Compensation - Damage and Distress
4.5 Direct Marketing
4.6 Automated Processing
4.7 Rectification, blocking, erasure and destruction.
4.8 Notification
4.9 Summary
 
5. The Principles
 
5.1 Introduction
5.2. The Principles
5.2.1 Principle One – Fairly and lawfully processed.
Schedule Two Conditions
Schedule 3 Conditions
5.2.2 Principle 2 Processing for one or more purposes.
5.2.3 Principle 3 Adequate, relevant and not excessive.
5.2.4 Principle 4 Accurate and up to date
5.2.5 Principle 5 Kept for no longer than is necessary
5.2.6 Principle 6 Rights of the data subject
5.2.7 Principle 7 Secure
5.2.8 Principle 8 Outside Europe
5.3 Conclusion
 
6. Access to Personal Data
 
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Access to the data subject’s personal data.
6.2.1 Subject Access Request
6.2.2 Scope of data to be released
6.2.3 Intelligible Format and Automatic Processed Data
6.2.4 Method of application
6.2.5 Fees
6.3 Access to third party data
6.4 Exemptions to section 7 requests.
6.4.1 Disproportionate effort
6.4.2 Same or similar requests
6.4.3 Trade secrets
6.4.4 Information prepared after a request
6.4.5 Credit reference agencies
6.4.6 Confidential references
6.4.7 Armed Forces, Judicial Appointments and Honours
6.4.8 Management Forecasts
6.4.9 Corporate Finance
6.4.10 Negotiations
6.4.11 Examination marks
6.4.12 Legal privilege
6.4.13 Self incrimination
6.5 Access for Crime Prevention, Detection and Taxation
6.6 Access by Health, Education and Social Work Professionals
6.7 Regulatory exemptions
6.8 Journalism, literature and Art
6.9 Research, history and statistics.
6.10 Already available to the public or by enactment
6.11 Disclosures required by law and the courts.
6.12 Domestic and recreational purposes.
6.13 Summary
 
7. Data Sharing
 
7.1 Introduction
7.2 The Guidelines
7.2 Protocols
7.4 Summary
 
8. The Freedom of Information Act 2000 and Environment Information Regulations 2004
 
8.1 Introduction
8.2 The Freedom of Information Act 2000
8.3 The Environmental Information Regulations 2004, SI 2004/3391
8.4 The Differences between the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004
8.5 The Section 45 Code of practice
8.6 Summary
 
9. Scope of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004
 
9.1 Definition of a Public Authority
9.2 What is a request?
9.3 Definition of Environmental Data
9.4 Fees
9.5 Timescales
9.6 Dissemination of Environmental Information
9.7 Consultation
9.8 Summary
 
10.  Application of Exemptions and Exceptions
 
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Exemptions under Freedom of Information Act
10.2.1 Section 21 Information accessible to the applicant by other means – (Regulation 6, Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.2 Section 22 Information intended for future publication – (Regulation 12 (4) (d) Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.3 Section 23 Information supplied by or relating to bodies dealing with security matters (Regulation 12 (5) (a), National Security, Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.4 Section 24 National Security (Regulation 12 (5) (a), National Security, Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.5 Section 25 Certificates
10.2.6 Section 26 Defence (Regulation 12 (5) (a), Defence Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.7 Section 27 International Relations (Regulation 12 (5) (a), International Relations Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.8 Section 28 Relations within the United Kingdom (Regulation 12 (4) (e), Internal Communications Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.9 Section 29 The Economy
10.2.10 Section 30 Investigations and proceedings conducted by public authorities. (Regulation 12 (5) (b), ability to conduct an inquiry to conduct of a criminal or disciplinary nature - Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.11 Section 31 Law Enforcement.(Regulation 12 (5) (b), course of justice - Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.12 Section 32 Court Records etc.(Regulation 12 (5) (b), course of justice also Regulation 3(3) does not apply to courts - Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.13 Section 33 Audit functions.(Regulation 12 (5) (b), ability of a public authority to conduct an inquiry - Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.14 Section 34 Parliamentary Privilege. (There is no equivalent exception under Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.15 Section 35 Function of Government Policy etc.(Regulation 12 (4) (e), disclosure of internal communication - Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.16 Section 36 Prejudice to the effective conduct of public affairs. (Regulation 12 (4) (e), disclosure of internal communications- Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.17 Section 37 Communications with Her Majesty etc. and honours. (There is no equivalent exception- Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.18 Section 38 Health and Safety (Regulation 12 (5) (a), public safety- Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.19 Section 39 Environmental Information (Not relevant- Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.20 Section 40 Personal Information (Regulation 13 Personal data - Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.21 Section 41 Information provided in confidence (Regulation 12 (5(d) confidentiality of proceedings- Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.22 Section 42 Legal professional privilege (No equivalent except for regulation 12(4)(e) request for internal communications  Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.23 Section 43 Commercial Interest (Regulation 12(5)(e), Commercial confidentiality or Regulation 12 (5)(c)   intellectual property rights -Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.24 Section 44 Prohibitions on disclosure (Not applicable - see Regulation 5 -Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.25 Section 13 Vexatious or repeated requests (Regulation 12(4)(b), Manifestly unreasonable -Environmental Information Regulations)
10.2.35 Other Exemptions (See under Chapter 10.3 below - Environmental Information Regulations)
10.3 Environmental Information Regulations -Exceptions
10.3.1 Regulation 12 (3) Personal data
10.3.2 Regulation 6 Information publicly available
10.3.3 Regulation 12(4) (a) Information not held
10.3.4 Regulation 12(4) (b) Request manifestly unreasonable
10.3.5 Regulation 12(4) (c) Request is too general
10.3.6 Regulation 12 (4) (d) Draft documents
10.3.7 Regulation 12 (4) (e) Internal communications
10.3.8 Regulation 12 (5) Adversely Effect
10.3.9 Regulation 12 (5) (a) International Relations, defence, national security or public safety.
10.3.10 Regulation 12 (5)(b) Justice and crime
10.3.11 Regulation 12 (5) (c) Intellectual Property Rights
10.3.12 Regulation 12 (5) (d) Confidentiality of proceeding
10.3.13 Regulation 12 (5) (e) Commercially Confidential
10.3.14 Regulation 12 (5) (f) Information supplied in confidence
10.3.15 Regulation 12 (5) (g) Protection of the Environment
10.4 Summary
 
11. The Public Interest Test
 
11.1 Introduction.
11.2 When and who applies the Test
11.3 What is the test?
11.4 Summary
 
12. Publication Schemes
 
12.1 Introduction
12.2 What does the scheme contain?
12.3 Summary
 
13. Compliance, the Information Commissioner and the Information Tribunal
 
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Compliance
13.3 The Information Commissioner
13.3.1 Overview
13.3.2 Decision Notices
13.3.3 Information Notices
13.3.4 Enforcement Notices
13.3.5 The Office of the Commissioner
13.4 The Information Tribunal
13.5 Summary
 
14. Disclosure Logs
 
14.1 Introduction
14.2 Benefits
14.3 Scope
14.4 Restrictions.
14.5 What goes into a disclosure log?
14.6 Maintenance
14.7 Summary
 
15. Records Management – Section 46 Code of Practice
 
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Purposes and scope of the code
15.3 Basic requirements of Records Management
15.3.1 Overview
15.3.2 Policy
15.3.3 Human Resource issues
15.3.4 Active Records Management
15.3.5 Creation and storage of Records
15.3.6 Disposal and retention periods
15.3.7 Electronic Records
15.4 Review and Transfer of Public Records
15.5 Summary
 
16. Other Legislation
 
16.1 Introduction
16.2 Human Rights Act 1998
16.3 Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000
16.3.1 Overview
16.3.2 Communications data
16.3.3 Surveillance
16.3.4 Summary
16.4 Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2005
16.5 Summary
 
17. Interaction of the Legislation
 
17.1 Introduction
17.2 Access to Personal Data
17.3 Human Rights
17.4 Environmental Information Regulations 2000
17.5 Copyright and Reuse regulations
17.6 Summary
 
18. Summary
 
18.1 Introduction
18.2 Data Protection
18.3 Freedom of Information Act
18.4 Environmental Information Regulations
18.5 Human Rights Act
18.6 Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act
18.7 Reuse of Public Sector Information Regulations
18.8 Records Management
18.9 Training
18.10 Summary
 
Appendix 1: Data Protection Principles
Appendix 2: Exemptions and Exceptions under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004
Freedom of Information Act
Environmental Information Regulations 2004
Appendix 3: Published Standards for Records Management
Appendix 4: Useful Web Addresses
Appendix 5: Flow Chart of FOI



1. Data Protection Act 1998 2. Definitions of personal data 3. The scope of the Data Protection Act 4. The data protection principles 5. Access to personal data 6. Data sharing 7. The Freedom of Information Act 2000 and EnvironmentalInformation regulations 2004, SI 2004/3391 8. Scope of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 9. Application of exemptions and exceptions 10. The public interest test 11. Publication schemes 12. Compliance, the Information Commissioner and the Information Tribunal 13. Disclosure logs 14. Records management � Section 46 code of practice 15. Other legislation 16. Interaction of the legislation 17. Summary Appendix 1. Data protection principles Appendix 2. Flow chart of FOI Appendix 3 Exemptions and exceptions under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 Appendix 4. Bibliography and useful web addresses Appendix 5. Published standards for records management.

"In summary, this is a handy overview of a number of pieces of legislation in the information rights field. Written in accessible plain English, and brought to life by practical examples, it is likely to prove useful to its targeted audience."
- Freedom of Information Journal

 

"A useful addition to the portfolio of must have by the desk publications. An excellent reference manual packed full of useful comment and references. I have already referred to it more than once."
- Records Management Society Journal

Alan Stead is an experienced practitioner in information rights, having managed a team at a unitary authority, and now runs his own training organization. He is an external examiner in an LLM in Information Rights, chairs the National Association for Information Management and is a member of a number of government consultation groups.

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