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Collection Development in the Digital Age

Dec 2011 | 256pp

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9781856047463
Price: £54.95
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9781856048972
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Collection Development in the Digital Age

Edited by Maggie Fieldhouse and Audrey Marshall

This topical edited collection is cross-sectoral and international in scope, drawing together the perspectives of practitioners and academics at the forefront of modern collection development. They explore how practitioners can take an active role influencing strategy in this new environment, draw on case studies that illustrate the key changes in context, and consider how collection development might evolve in the future.

The collection is divided into four sections looking at the key themes:

  • The conceptual framework including a review of the literature
  • Trends in library supply such as outsourcing and managing suppliers
  • Trends in electronic resources including the open access movement and e-books
  • Making and keeping your collection effectively including engaging with the user-community and developing commercial skills.

Readership: LIS students and all practitioners involved in collection development and management in academic, school, public, commercial and other special libraries.

Foreword - Liz Chapman
Introduction - Audrey Marshall and Maggie Fieldhouse

PART 1: THE CONCEPT AND PRACTICE OF COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT

1. The concept of collection development in the digital world - Sheila Corrall
2. The processes of collection management - Maggie Fieldhouse

PART 2: TRENDS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF E-RESOURCES

3. An overview of e-resources in UK further and higher education - David House
4. Supporting online collections: the role of online journals in a university collection - Jane Harvell
5. Electronic books in academic libraries: a case study in Liverpool, UK - Terry Bucknell
6. E-book collection development in public libraries: a case study of the Essex  experience - Martin Palmer
7. Stewardship and curation in a digital world - Bradley Daigle

PART 3: TRENDS IN LIBRARY SUPPLY

8. Managing suppliers for collection development: the UK higher education perspective - David Ball
9. Outsourcing in public libraries: placing collection management in the hands of a stranger? - Diana Edmonds
10. Open access - David Brown
11. Collection development and institutional repositories - Josh Brown

PART 4: MAKING AND KEEPING YOUR COLLECTION EFFECTIVE

12. Collection development policies for the digital age - Wendy Shaw
13. Information literacy for the academic librarian in the digital information age: supporting users to make effective use of the collection - Tracy Mitrano and Karrie Peterson
14. Supporting users to make effective use of the collection - Ruth Stubbings
15. Engaging with the user community to make your collection work effectively: a case study of a partnership-based, multi-campus UK medical school - Jil Fairclough

"I would recommend this book to all those interested in collection development...Its coverage is extensive and reflects a cross-section of the experience of librarians and information professionals."
- Journal of Librarianship and Information Science

"...recommended to practitioners from all libraries. It can also serve as recommended reading for undergraduate students considering the spectrum of topics covered, the ease of writing style, and the excellent lists of references."
- The Electronic Library

"In Collection Development in the Digital Age
- editors Fieldhouse and Marshall explore developments in collection development and their influence on policy and practice, draw on case studies that illustrate changes and desirable skills in context, and contemplate how collection development may evolve in time. The book will appeal to library and information science professionals involved in collection management in academic and public libraries, as well as students in the field."

- Library Management

"Highly recommended for all professionals who wish to ensure that they develop their collections to preserve the past, serve the present and provide for the future."
- CILIP Update

Maggie Fieldhouse is a Lecturer at the Department of Information Studies at University College London. She is module tutor for the Collection Management and Management modules on the MA Library and Information Studies Programme.

Audrey Marshall is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Computing, Mathematical and Information Sciences at the University of Brighton and course Leader for the MA in Information Studies.

1. The concept of collection development in the digital world - Sheila Corrall

This chapter starts by examining a few definitions of the library as a collection to demonstrate the centrality of collection development to library and information professionals. Next, it moves on to the more problematic issue of collection development as a concept, showing how professional discourse on the subject has suffered from confused terminology. It then uses a convenient four-phase framework to review the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on libraries, concentrating on its effects on collections and their development. The final part of the chapter returns to academic and practitioner conceptions of collection development in digital environments, concluding with a set of questions for reflection on the future of collection development.

2. The processes of collection management - Maggie Fieldhouse

This chapter considers, with particular reference to academic libraries, the processes of collection management that have developed over time as technology and publishing models have changed. It considers the core activities of collection management and identifies how the digital age has transformed the processes underpinning library resource provision from the relevant literature. Its purpose is to update the established practices described in the standard textbooks by Johnson (2009), Clayton and Gorman (2006), Evans and Saponaro (2005) and Jenkins and Morley (1999), by referring readers to the wisdom of those authorities whose knowledge withstands the test of time. The chapter concludes by focusing on the issues raised and identifies some points for further reflection.

3. An overview of e-resources in UK further and higher education - David House

This chapter introduces this section with an overview of electronic resources in UK further and higher education. It traces the development of the hybrid library and the impact of key policy initiatives in the UK, which encouraged library and information professionals to look into the future. The chapter also notes, however, that those reports and initiatives from the 1990s assumed that libraries would remain the principal providers of academic information within institutions and how this situation has changed and is changing, particularly with regard to user expectations. It outlines the key role that JISC and JISC Collections have played with regard to e-journals, open access, ebooks and digitization projects. The chapter concludes that while the traditional role played by the academic library is now being challenged, the role of the library and information professional is ever more important in understanding user needs and ensuring that information is ‘findable and deliverable’.

4. Supporting online collections: the role of online journals in a university collection - Jane Harvell

This chapter outlines the issues involved in managing the shift from print to online, discuss the challenges and explore some of the solutions we are considering and working with in academic libraries today. A number of these solutions anticipate the future for collections and the chapter considers what this means for the information profession.

5. Electronic books in academic libraries: a case study in Liverpool, UK - Terry Bucknell

Electronic books have taken much longer than electronic journals to be accepted into the mainstream of academic library collections. This chapter reviews the experiences of one UK academic library in developing its e-book collection, some of the impacts it has had on processes and workflows and the analysis that has been carried out. It outlines how this has helped us to understand what gets used and why, and what the most costeffective methods are to build an e-books collection that meets user needs. Finally, the chapter considers some of the challenges that lie ahead.

6. E-book collection development in public libraries: a case study of the Essex  experience - Martin Palmer

In 2002 Essex Libraries were asked by the Co-East partnership (a co-operative organization consisting of all the public library authorities in the east of England at that time) and Loughborough University to host a project funded by the LASER Foundation to investigate the feasibility of providing e-books in UK public libraries. This chapter outlines the project and uses the perspective of collection development to discuss the issues arising from it.

7. Stewardship and curation in a digital world - Bradley Daigle

Digital formats present us with unprecedented challenges for capturing and preserving information and making it accessible for future generations. The world is perhaps only just waking up to this ‘vexed proposition’ but in Bradley Daigle’s view now is the time to be strategic about it. In this chapter, he argues that we need to apply the same attention to digital material that we have done in the past to preserve and manage physical collections. He explores the concepts of stewardship and curation in a digital context and outlines a framework for a stewardship policy, through a carefully crafted set of questions. He argues that the key to success for successful stewardship is clarity around organizational goals and collaboration with colleagues and that efforts invested now will reap rewards in the future.

8. Managing suppliers for collection development: the UK higher education perspective - David Ball

This chapter examines how academic librarians are now managing their suppliers and, in particular, how they have had to adapt to learn and adopt the discipline of procurement. It outlines the standard procurement cycle, highlighting the importance of a well written specification as the basis for sound supplier selection. It goes on to explore the development of library purchasing consortia and their success in driving down costs in the academic marketplace and improving quality of service. It concludes by reflecting that the role of the academic librarian will be reversed – rather than collecting the output of the world’s scholars and making it available to institutional users, the task in the future is to make the institution’s output available to the world. This is a very different perspective on collection development.

9. Outsourcing in public libraries: placing collection management in the hands of a stranger? - Diana Edmonds

This chapter examines how outsourcing has become embedded in stock management in public libraries in the UK. It considers the implications of EU procurement requirements and discusses the outsourcing of library services to companies such as Instant Library. Looking to the future, it explores how shared services can offer economic benefits to local authorities.

10. Open access - David Brown

This chapter begins his chapter on the ‘open access’ movement by addressing the question of why it is important. His answer highlights two key factors. First, that it makes it possible for research output to reach a much wider audience than has hitherto been the case, having been largely confined to research or academic library users, and second, that open access business models make little or no demands on library acquisition budgets. These two factors have significant implications for the role of research libraries in the future and for the nature of their collections. The chapter goes on to explore the different and emerging open access models, examining the practical, commercial and ethical issues raised in each case. Although Ball wisely resists the temptation to forecast which – if any – of the models will be most widely adopted in the near future, he presents a convincing case for open access dissemination as the dominant means of scholarly communication for the future.

11. Collection development and institutional repositories - Josh Brown

This chapter begins by exploring the diversity of repository practices and approaches that have emerged over the last decade, and demonstrates the challenges for collection development raised by their differing priorities. The main part of this chapter focuses on the practical realities of advocacy, and the ways that tools and services that are available to aid deposit and to make use of IR content can support this work. In conclusion, emphasis falls on the centrality of good collection development practice to the success of the IR, and its contribution to its home institution.

12. Collection development policies for the digital age - Wendy Shaw

Collection Management embraces a range of different activities, including selection and acquisition, collection evaluation, collection review, preservation and promotional aspects. To support these essential collection management processes, there needs to be a viable and pragmatic written Collection Development Policy (CDP). An informal, verbal agreement is insufficient if you are going to have a commitment to systematic collection building or development. This chapter defines what a CDP is and describe the individual components and overall structure that make up a written CDP. The role of a CDP is discussed and guidance offered on how to devise and implement a CDP. Extracts from existing CDPs are offered as working examples to illustrate points and for you to explore in more detail.

13. Information literacy for the academic librarian in the digital information age: supporting users to make effective use of the collection - Tracy Mitrano and Karrie Peterson

This chapter shows how the researchers and scholars of today are much less dependent on librarians to access the information they need and how that in itself brings its own set of challenges – to the scholars and librarians alike. It focuses, however, on the opportunities this situation presents, exploring the ways in which IL tools can be embedded in information resources.

14. Supporting users to make effective use of the collection - Ruth Stubbings

This chapter discusses the importance of electronic information to the functioning of modern societies. It argues that policy makers have tended to ignore questions around IL, concentrating instead on access and use issues. Libraries, likewise, spend large amounts of money on information and must ensure that users can use them effectively. It goes on to explore some of the existing approaches to IL and ways to put them into practice.

15. Engaging with the user community to make your collection work effectively: a case study of a partnership-based, multi-campus UK medical school - Jil Fairclough

This chapter explores methods for engaging the user community and maximizing the use of library collections. It uses as a case study the Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS), a partnership involving the University of Brighton, the University of Sussex and Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust in the UK. Practical examples are used to highlight where strategies have resulted in increased usage of collections and increased engagement with the user community.

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