look_inside
Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries

Mar 2016 | 176pp

Paperback
9781783300495
Price: £49.95
CILIP members price: £39.96

eBook (PDF)
9781783301225
How to buy eBooks turqoise_arrow


Share this page


Join our mailing list

Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries

Edited by Starr Hoffman

This inspiring book will enable academic librarians to develop excellent research and instructional services and create a library culture that encompasses exploration, learning and collaboration.

Higher education and academic libraries are in a period of rapid evolution. Technology, pedagogical shifts, and programmatic changes in education mean that libraries must continually evaluate and adjust their services to meet new needs. Research and learning across institutions is becoming more team-based, crossing disciplines and dependent on increasingly sophisticated and varied data. To provide valuable services in this shifting, diverse environment, libraries must think about new ways to support research on their campuses, including collaborating across library and departmental boundaries.

This book is intended to enrich and expand your vision of research support in academic libraries by:

  • Inspiring you to think creatively about new services.
  • Sparking ideas of potential collaborations within and outside the library, increasing awareness of functional areas that are potential key partners. 
  • Providing specific examples of new services, as well as the decision-making and implementation process. 
  • Encouraging you to take a broad view of research support rather than thinking of research and instruction services, metadata creation and data services etc as separate initiatives.

Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries provides illustrative examples of emerging models of research support and is contributed to by library practitioners from across the world. The book is divided into three sections:

  • Part I: Training and Infrastructure, which describes the role of staff development and library spaces in research support
  • Part II: Data Services and Data Literacy, which sets out why the rise of research data services in universities is critical to supporting the current provision of student skills that will help develop them as data-literate citizens.
  • Part III: Research as a Conversation, which discusses academic library initiatives to support the dissemination, discovery and critical analysis of research.

Readership: This is an essential guide for librarians and information professionals involved in supporting research and scholarly communication, as well as library administrators and students studying library and information science.

Introduction: a vision for supporting research - Starr Hoffman

Part 1: Training and infrastructure

Introduction to Part 1 - Starr Hoffman
1. Constructing a model for Mexican libraries in the 21st century - Alberto Santiago Martinez
2. Researching illustrated books in art history: a brief history of the Biblioteca Digital Ovidiana project - Fátima Díez-Platas
3. The ‘Developing Librarian’ digital scholarship pilot training project - Richard Freeman    

Part 2: Data services and data literacy    

Introduction to Part 2 - Jackie Carter
4. Training researchers to manage data for better results, re-use and long-term access - Heather Coates
5. Data services for the research lifecycle: the Digital Social Science Center - Ashley Jester
6. Mapping unusual research needs: supporting GIS across non-traditional disciplines - Karen Munro

Part 3: Research as a conversation

Introduction to Part 3 - Starr Hoffman
7. Implementing open access across a large university: a case study - Dominic Tate
8. Bridging the gap: easing the transition to higher education with an information literacy MOOC - Mariann Løkse, Helene N. Andreassen, Torstein Låg and Mark Stenersen
9. Metadata enhancement through name authority in the UNT Digital Library - Hannah Tarver and Mark Phillips

 

"I greatly enjoyed this book, in particular the well-crafted and engaging introductions. There was much on which to reflect, and prompt new ways of thinking and working in the library sector. A particular strength of this title is its broad appeal to any library engaged in research support."
- An Leabharlann

“Hoffman’s collection showcases how we can add long-term value for our users by focusing on going “deeper” and delivering comprehensive specialist services which tap into a very real need. Whilst such projects may require significant investment (particularly in terms of staff time, which is a recurring motif), the examples in Dynamic Research Support provide evidence that the return will often far exceed the cost.”
- Michelle Dalton, Libfocus

"Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries" provides illustrative examples of emerging models of research support and is contributed to by library practitioners from across the world. Knowledgeably compiled and expertly edited by Starr Hoffman (Head of Planning and Assessment at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where she assesses many activities, including the library's support for and impact on research), "Dynamic Research Support for Academic Libraries" is strongly recommended for college and university Library Science instructional reference collections and supplemental studies reading lists.
- Midwest Book Review

Starr Hoffman is Head of Planning and Assessment at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where she assesses many activities, including the library’s support for and impact on research. Previously she supported data-intensive research as the Journalism and Digital Resources Librarian at Columbia University in New York. Her research interests include the impact of academic libraries on students and faculty, the role of libraries in higher education and models of effective academic leadership. When she’s not researching, she’s taking photographs and travelling the world. 

 

Contributors:

Helene N. Andreassen, Senior Academic Librarian, University Library, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Jackie Carter, Director for Engagement with Research Methods Training, University of Manchester, UK

Heather Coates, Digital Scholarship and Data Management Librarian, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), USA

Fátima Díez-Platas, Assistant Professor, Art History Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Richard Freeman, Anthropology Librarian, University of Florida’s George A. Smathers Libraries, USA

Ashley Jester, Data Services Coordinator, Digital Social Science Center, Columbia University Libraries, USA

Torstein Låg, Senior Academic Librarian, University Library, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Mariann Løkse, Head of the Library Services Department, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Alberto Santiago Martinez, Digital Initiatives Librarian and head of Digital Scholarship Unit, Daniel Cosío Villegas Library at El Colegio de México, Mexico City

Karen Munro, Head of the University of Oregon Portland Library and Learning Commons, USA

Mark Phillips, Assistant Dean for Digital Libraries, University of North Texas (UNT), USA

Mark Stenersen, Consultant in Visual Communication, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Result, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Hannah Tarver, Department Head, Digital Projects Unit, University of North Texas Libraries, USA

Dominic Tate, University of Edinburgh’s Scholarly Communications Manager, UK

1. Constructing a model for Mexican libraries in the 21st Century – Alberto Santiago Martinez

 This chapter presents a case study of the library renovation and expansion project implemented at The Daniel Cosío Villegas Library at El Colegio de México (Colmex) in Mexico City. In 2012, the university took on the task of renovating and expanding its sole library. The project goal was to create a flagship library that would be a model for 21st-century research libraries across Mexico. However, defining what a Mexican library should be for the 21st century is a daunting task, given that national literature on the topic is sparse and international models may not be relevant for Mexican libraries in general, nor in the unique situation of the Colmex library. The library conducted a series of studies to understand the behaviour, opinions and requirements of the campus community with the intention of creating a user-oriented solution.

Through an iterative planning process, we developed a plan that pairs traditional library services (to which the community was accustomed) along with new types of digital scholarship support services. This was accomplished in part by designing spaces that adapt to evolving research and pedagogical practices while also considering the library’s regional context. The result is a plan that will transform the traditional model of the Daniel Cosío Villegas Library into one that caters to new modes of information access, interaction, learning, creation and dissemination.

 

2. Researching illustrated books in art history: a brief history of the Biblioteca Digital Ovidiana project – Fátima Díez-Platas

This chapter presents an example of a digital humanities research project created by faculty using an academic library collection. This project was developed using the Rare Books and Special Collections of Biblioteca Xeral (the main library of the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain) to enhance art history scholarship.

 

3. The ‘Developing Librarian’ digital scholarship pilot training project – Richard Freeman

In February 2014 a group of library faculty, curators, and staff at the University of Florida (UF) Smathers Libraries formed the Digital Humanities Library Group (DHLG). The group was to be a reading group to discuss issues on digital scholarship (DS), including the state of DS in the UF libraries. Members also had the intention to put the theory into practice. The group began with an invitation to librarians and staff. Twenty-six responded, the majority of whom were library faculty. The first few meetings were well attended, with over a dozen attendees. Within six months, a training project intended to give us new DS skills was created, a mini-grant was procured and the ‘Developing Librarian’ digital scholarship pilot training project began. This chapter uses ethnographic methods – participant observation, surveys and interviews with individual participants – to tell the narrative of this project: how and why it started, what goals and aspirations the participants have, and how they evaluated it.

 

4. Training researchers to manage data for better results, re-use and long-term access – Heather Coates

This chapter describes Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis’ initial foray into data information literacy instruction, and the lessons learned, and look forward to the future of such programmes. We drew upon best practices in instructional design and information literacy, the scientific lab experience (Coates, 2014), and interdisciplinary data management expertise to develop the programme. The focus is on practical techniques for responsible data management and relies heavily on the data management plan (DMP) as a tool for teaching and research. This chapter describes the development of our instructional programme, assessment results, and modifications to portray an emerging data literacy programme at a high-research-activity university.

 

5. Data services for the research lifecycle: the Digital Social Science Center – Ashley Jester

While data has been a feature of academic research since the early 20th century, it is only in the last decade that it has become such a ubiquitous feature of academic life – and all modern experience – that it has taken root in all aspects of the education environment. Concomitant with the rise in the awareness of ‘data’ as both a concept for debate and discussion and an object of study and analysis has been the rise of the idea of ‘data literacy’ or the ability to understand and interpret data. Different institutions have responded to the growth of data differently, and these choices often reflect circumstances of time as much as institutional traditions and organizational structures. This chapter will discuss how support for data has developed and grown at Columbia University Libraries, specifically within the Digital Social Science Center (herein, DSSC). While much of the development of data services at Columbia can be traced to a specific set of circumstances existing at a particular point in time, the overall trajectory of these services presents several general principles that can provide insights for other institutions.

 

6. Mapping unusual research needs: supporting GIS across non-traditional disciplines – Karen Munro

Although GIS has been in wide use by geographers for decades, many other professions are unaware of its potential. This is ironic, since many of us now use GIS on a regular basis, even daily, through popular and free end-user applications such as Google Maps. But GIS isn’t just about finding your blue dot on the freeway exit map, or asking where the closest Starbucks is. For students conducting academic research, GIS can be a powerful tool, adding unexpected depth and power to projects across a wide range of disciplines – and librarians can help make it happen.

There’s more to GIS than simply building maps by layering datasets, as any cartographer, geographer or other in-depth user will know. Understanding these basic concepts, and learning how to put them to use with ArcGIS or similar software, is enough to get any librarian or student started on an exciting new research project.

 

7. Implementing open access across a large university: a case study – Dominic Tate

Edinburgh University Library is in the midst of undertaking a programme to facilitate the widespread adoption of open access (OA) to journal articles and conference proceedings across the entire University, in line with current UK higher education funding council policy.

Over the last few years there has been a significant increase in the number of institutional and research-funder policies mandating OA research results, taking advantage of both green and gold routes. UK research funders have recognized that it is their responsibility not only to fund the original research, but also to ensure the widest possible dissemination of its results. For that reason, some funders do not limit their policies to green OA, but also extend them to gold OA, and take responsibility for covering gold article-processing charges (APCs) when they arise.

OA policy in the UK is evolving very rapidly, and in 2013 it was announced that from 2016, journal articles and conference proceedings must be deposited in a repository and made OA wherever this is possible (subject to publisher embargo), otherwise they would not be eligible for future research assessment exercises. For the first time in the UK, this policy has linked the OA agenda with research assessment – something which may have implications for university funding – and this has significantly increased the importance of OA to universities.

 

8. Bridging the gap: easing the transition to higher education with an information literacy MOOC – Mariann Løkse, Helene N. Andreassen, Torstein Låg and Mark Stenersen

What do students need to learn to get the most out of their academic studies? How can the library support their learning process in the best possible way? Are our current information literacy (IL) classes what we want them to be?

After repeatedly asking ourselves these questions, we gradually realized we needed to refocus and adjust our teaching and learning services to meet the needs of new students. Thus, the iKomp MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) was born, and with it a chance to introduce modern teaching methods in our IL instruction, together with a more dialogue-based communication with first-year students.

In this chapter, we describe the development of our MOOC, entitled iKomp and created at UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, in the period 2013–15 (http://ikomp.no). The chapter is organized as follows: first, we present iKomp and then we expand on the needs that caused us to develop it. The following section is devoted to the reasons we had for creating the course on a MOOC platform, and we go on to detail the platform selection and course implementation. In the next section we review the reception of iKomp, followed by a section presenting the lessons learned. We close our chapter in a final section with some reflections on how iKomp can support research and learning.

 

9. Metadata enhancement through name authority in the UNT Digital Library – Hannah Tarver and Mark Phillips

Over time, cataloguing  – or, more broadly, metadata creation  – has been standardized in various structured ways to ensure consistency at a local level and the ability to easily share resource descriptions among institutions. Within these structures, authority control functions as a key component for usability by enabling optimal search and retrieval of relevant resources by users. There are a number of areas in which authority control is important for libraries, including subjects, locations and names of organizations, events and persons. Name authority tends to pose a particular problem, because a metadata creator may need additional information associated with an authority heading to determine whether a name applies (particularly in the case of multiple persons with similar names). This may require a separate database of authority entries with contextual information, rather than a list of authorized terms or thesaurus, which are sufficient for some forms of authority control. A number of initiatives in the library environment, both historically and in the present, have attempted to generate and share name authority records, and to address the challenge of keeping these systems up to date and relevant. In the past decade there has been an asserted effort to move name authority files from locally managed library databases to the open web. For example, Ilik (2014) discusses the growing need to incorporate name authority sources and tools beyond traditional MARC records to better serve local needs. The goal is to make use of technologies such as linked open data (LOD) in order to capitalize on the extensive name authority work we’ve already done in this space, so that it becomes more widely adoptable and usable by the rest of the web.

 

 

 

 

 

 

More titles in this category >>