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Linked Data for Cultural Heritage

Oct 2016 | 160pp

Paperback
9781783301621
Price: £59.95
CILIP members price: £47.95


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Linked Data for Cultural Heritage

Edited by Ed Jones and Michele Seikel

This book gathers a stellar list of contributors to help readers understand linked data concepts by examining practice and projects based in libraries, archives, and museums.

Linked open data remains very much a work in progress, and much of the progress has taken place within the domain of the cultural heritage institutions: libraries, archives, and museums.

There is no question that the structure of linked data, and the machine inferencing it supports, shows great promise for discoverability. What will be the ‘killer app’ that breaks linked open data out to the wider world and accelerates its uptake? Perhaps it will be a project described in this volume.

Content covered includes:

  • a very simple description of linked data, summing up its promises and challenges
  • a survey of the use of linked data in significant projects across the cultural heritage domain, including Europeana and the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)
  • practical discussion of migrating a catalogue from a MARC environment to one of linked data and the possibilities that open up in terms of the broader scholarly community
  • reviewing and reimagining library thesauri, metadata schemas, and information discovery, to look at how controlled vocabularies integrate library practice with linked data
  • an examination of the role of authority control, identifiers and vocabularies, including use of the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and the SPARQL query language
  • Carol Jean Godby describes OCLC’s experiments with Schema.org as the foundation for a model of library resource description expressed as linked data
  • the development of the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) data model and a description of the fundamental differences between MARC and BIBFRAME.

Readership: This survey of the cultural heritage linked data landscape will be a key resource for metadata practitioners and researchers within all cultural heritage contexts and all students and academics within the information science and digital humanities fields.

Introduction - Ed Jones

1. Linked Open Data and the Cultural Heritage Landscape - Hilary K. Thorsen and M. Christina Pattuelli

2.  Making MARC Agnostic: Transforming the English Short Title Catalogue for the Linked Data Universe - Carl Stahmer

3.  Authority Control for the Web: Integrating Library Practice with Linked Data - Allison Jai O’Dell

4. Linked Data Implications for Authority Control and Vocabularies: An STM Perspective - Iker Huerga and Michael P. Lauruhn

5. A Division of Labor: The Role of Schema.org in a Semantic Web Model of Library Resources - Carol Jean Godby

6. BIBFRAME and Linked Data for Libraries - Sally McCallum

About the Contributors

Index

 

Ed Jones has been cataloguing serials, on and off, since 1976, and over the years has authored several scholarly papers and made numerous presentations on serials cataloguing, the FRBR and FRAD conceptual models, and RDA. He has been a member of the CONSER Operations Committee, on and off, since 1981, and recently served as an RDA advisor. In 1995, he received his doctorate in library and information science from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. He is currently associate director for assessment and technical services at National University in San Diego.

Michele Seikel is Professor of Digital Resources and Discovery Services at Oklahoma State University.

 

Contributors:

Hilary K. Thorsen; M. Christina Pattuelli; Carl Stahmer; Allison Jai O’Dell; Iker Huerga; Michael P. Lauruhn; Carol Jean Godby; Sally McCallum

1. Linked Open Data and the Cultural Heritage Landscape–Hilary K. Thorsen and M. Christina Pattuelli

In chapter 1, Hilary Thorsen (Stanford University) and M. Christina Pattuelli (Pratt Institute) survey the use of linked data in significant projects across the cultural heritage domain, including Europeana and the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), before proceeding to a more detailed description of Linked Jazz, a research project aimed at using linked data technologies “to uncover meaningful connections between documents and data related to the personal and professional lives of jazz artists” and development of related linked data tools and methods.

2. Making MARC Agnostic–Carl Stahmer

In chapter 2, Carl Stahmer (University of California) describes the migration of the renowned English Short Title Catalog (ESTC) from a MARC environment to one of linked data and the possibilities that migration opens up, especially in terms of involving the broader scholarly community in maintaining and enhancing ESTC metadata.

3. Authority Control for the Web–Allison Jai O’Dell

In chapter 3, Allison Jai O’Dell (University of Florida) reviews and reimagines library thesauri, metadata schemas, and information discovery, looking at how controlled vocabularies integrate library practice with linked data and exploring existing practices that are amenable to linked data, as well as areas for expansion of best practices in a linked data environment.

4. Linked Data Implications for Authority Control and Vocabularies–Iker Huerga and Michael P. Lauruhn

In chapter 4, Iker Huerga (Signifikance) and Michael Lauruhn (Elsevier Labs) examine linked data and authority control from the perspective of STM publishing, describing the role of authority control, identifiers, and vocabularies, including use of the Web Ontology Language (OWL) to add more formal semantics and the use of the SPARQL query language to create mappings between vocabularies.

5. A Division of Labor–Carol Jean Godby

In chapter 5, Carol Jean Godby (OCLC) describes OCLC’s experiments with Schema.org as the foundation for a model of library resource description expressed as linked data, using 900 million catalog records accessible from WorldCat.org. Godby reports that “OCLC’s experiments have shown that Schema.org can be used to define a model . . . which can be expressed in a published standard with institutional backing and potential for widespread adoption.”

6. BIBFRAME and Linked Data for Libraries–Sally McCallum

In chapter 6, Sally McCallum (Library of Congress) relates the development of the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) data model, the linked data successor to the data model represented by the MARC 21 formats, describing the fundamental differences between MARC and BIBFRAME. BIBFRAME is designed to be particularly suited as an exchange format for bibliographic data created using Resource Description and Access. The Library of Congress implemented a BIBFRAME pilot in the third quarter of 2015.