Format:
Hardback
ISBN:
9781783303120
Published:
Dimensions:
237mm x 165mm x 20mm
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Research, Evaluation and Audit: Key Steps in Demonstrating Your Value

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£129.95



This handbook provides library and information professionals with the information they need to undertake research projects in the workplace in order to inform their own practice and improve service delivery.
Whether you are a complete novice or have experience of undertaking evaluations, audits or research, this book will guide you step-by-step through the key phases of planning, doing and disseminating research. The text is divided into three sections:
Part 1: Getting started introduces the concepts, ethics and planning stages. • Part 2: Doing research, evaluation and audit explores the fundamentals of projects, including the literature review, qualitative and quantitative research methods, data analysis and research tools. • Part 3: Impact of research, evaluation and audit guides you through writing up your project, putting the results of your project findings into practice and dissemination to the wider community.
Written by academics and practitioners from a diverse range of sectors throughout the world, the book offers a thorough but common sense approach. Each chapter is structured to begin with a comprehensive introduction to a discrete topic area complemented with case studies drawn from a broad range of LIS contexts to illustrate the issues raised and provide transferable lessons to your own context. Whatever your experience, this book will support your project development and explain how evidence-based library and information practice is relevant to you.
Readership: This is the essential handbook for any librarian or information professional who wants to undertake research in the workplace in order to inform their own practice and the wider evidence base for library and information science. It's also a useful guide for undergraduate and postgraduate LIS students undertaking their final year research project.

Foreword - Hazel Hall
PART 1: GETTING STARTED
1. What are research, evaluation and audit? - Barbara Sen, Maria J. Grant and Hannah Spring 2. Building confidence - Hannah Spring and Clare McClusky 3. Asking the right question - Sarah Coulbeck and Emma Hadfield 4. Writing your research plan - Miggie Pickton 5. Ethics and best practice - Elizabeth Buchanan and Stuart Ferguson
PART 2: DOING RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND AUDIT
6. Reviewing the literature - Michelle Maden 7. Qualitative approaches - Alison Pickard 8. Quantitative approaches - Christine Urquhart 9. Data analysis - Jenny Craven and Jillian R. Griffiths 10. Tools to facilitate your project - Maria J. GrantPART 3: IMPACT OF RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND AUDIT 11. Writing up your project findings - Graham Walton and Maria J. Grant 12. Disseminating your project findings - Jane Shelling 13. What next? Applying your findings to practice - Robert Gent and Andrew Cox Closing remarks - Maria J. Grant, Barbara Sen and Hannah Spring

Maria J. Grant BA (Hons) MSc (Econ) PG Cert (Ed) is Research Fellow (Information) at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Salford, UK.
Barbara Sen BA MA MCLIP is Lecturer at the Information School, University of Sheffield, UK.
Hannah Spring PGCE BA (Hons) PhD MCLIP is Senior Lecturer at York St John University, UK.

I strongly recommend this book, for at least one single reading, to my professional colleagues in the working settings. I do hope that they will find it helpful and use it in 'demonstrating their value' as has been suggested by editors in its sub-title. I would also suggest this book as a source book to students and practitioners who aim to write their own text in practice or research. It is step-by-step guide in doing research or working on research project. Final term students in library and information science should not miss reading it. They will definitely like it and will keep it with them while working on the research element of their education.

Information Research

Overall I found this an excellent book for a new researcher like myself. It took me through each stage sequentially, and I could look at past and present projects I have worked on, break them down to see room for improvement. It also opened up future opportunities that I could explore. It is written with the practitioner in mind, using excellent case studies and giving the guidance and checklists required to keep the practitioner-researcher on track. This is a book I will constantly be dipping in and out of.

Australian Library Journal

Grant, Sen, and Spring guide library and information science practitioners in undertaking a research, evaluation, or audit activity, drawing on the 10 steps of the research toolkit of HEALER (a UK-based network for improving research in health information management). Contributed by library and information science specialists from the UK, Australia, and US, the 13 chapters cover concepts, ethics, and the planning stages; the fundamentals of research projects, including the literature review, qualitative and quantitative methods, data analysis, and research tools; and writing up the project, putting results into practice, and disseminating them to the wider community. Case studies are provided as examples.

Research and Reference Book News

To me this book is not so much a one-stop-shop for those undertaking research in LIS; instead its greatest value lies in how it gently steers the reader through the research terrain, highlighting both the pitfalls and best routes to take, and giving them the context and insight to navigate and reach their own destination. Indeed it is likely that once the reader gets involved in any kind of project, this will be just one of several research texts that they reach for. However, it might ultimately end up being the most essential, by being the one that started them on their journey in the first place.

Libfocus

A consistent approach is maintained among the multiple authors, with clear language, an encouraging tone and an ability to engage from first principles. Each chapter is supported by case studies and further reading, linking real-world experience to theory and offering further development paths. It is fundamentally a textbook in style, and would be a ready reference work for any information professional interested in expanding his/her research skills...the structure is clear and is easy to navigate, allowing the reader to dip in and out of the book according to interest and needs.

Archives and Records

...highly recommended for anyone about to begin or simply interested in the processes of research, evaluating or auditing.

Australian Academic & Research Libraries

To me this book is not so much a one-stop-shop for those undertaking research in LIS; instead its greatest value lies in how it gently steers the reader through the research terrain, highlighting both the pitfalls and best routes to take, and giving them the context and insight to navigate and reach their own destination. Indeed it is likely that once the reader gets involved in any kind of project, this will be just one of several research texts that they reach for. However, it might ultimately end up being the most essential, by being the one that started them on their journey in the first place.

Libfocus

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